The Intern – Review


 Okay, so this has been awhile since I wrote a movie review. 

The Intern stars Robert De Niro, Anne Hathaway and Adam DeVine (of Pitch Perfect fame.)
There has been a lot of puns about Devil Makes Prada (Andy the next Miranda, etc). In this case, those puns, for people who haven’t watched it, fall very, very short.

Miranda Priestly did not neccessarily care for her husbands – she wanted a good father figure for her twin daughters. She wasn’t upset when her husband asked for a divorce, and she wasn’t a workaholic – she was just impossible to deal with.

Anne Hathaway’s character – Jules Ostin – is the head of a up-and-rising company, a mother of a young girl and wife to a stay-at-home dad. She’s a control freak and perfectionist – wants to do everything from taking calls to handling shipment issues and marketing plans. She’s young, high-strung – but that’s because she started the company – About The Fit – on her own and is now struggling to keep up to the change. In the beginning, you see her being late to two meetings (one at 4:10, and another at 4:25). She’s also the last person to leave the office, whereas Miranda has a stipulated time of leaving to be with her twins.

Now let’s get back to the review of the actual movie.

The Intern is about a 70-year-old man named Ben Whittaker who becomes the intern at Jules Ostin’s upcoming e-commerce fashion company. Ben is taken as an intern, under Jules Ostin.



This movie is along the same lines of Silver Linings Playbook, minus the craziness the characters exhibit. Ben Whittaker, played by veteran actor Robert De Niro, is an optimistic, smart and observant, silver-haired widower who is not afraid to get down and dirty to get the work done. It’s definitely a slower paced movie than The Avengers, but it’s a people movie, rather than an action movie.

This movie also couldn’t come at a better time, as seniors around the world are getting re-hired to do work that they love, and keep busy. The cinematography in this movie is superb, highlighting the different mindset between older generations and the present generations. There’s one scene, when people are getting settled into their cubicles, where the young people are taking out their laptops, speakers, handphones etc, while Ben takes out this vintage briefcase – *heart eyes* – and when he opens it up, everything is in its place. He pulls out a notebook, an old-fashioned calculator, a traditional pen, and sets them carefully on the table.


There’s also another scene, which is shown in the trailer, where Jules and Ben bond over Ben’s registering for a Facebook account. It’s very sweet, and there’s no romance in this – the romance is entirely with Matt, Jules’ husband. Jules and Ben are more like best friends then anything else – he even helps keep her hair out of her face when she pukes! The friendship here is very organic and natural – two smart people who end up being partner-in-crimes.

The Intern is like a better version of Valentine’s Day (2010). That movie, in my opinion, suffered from the fact that there was too much happening in one movie, and also the Cheese Factor. It’s movies like these that make me hate romance movies. A lot of the movies recently have had very forced chemistry, but not so with The Intern. There is a breathing space for characters to interact and connect. The comedy here is also very organic – no spoilers here, you need to see it to laugh it.

There’s really nothing bad about The Intern that I can say about it. It’s a breath of fresh air from the ‘next-next-next’ mentality the world exists in, and gives us time to slow down, and look over the fence for a bit. And the fact is, experience never gets old. 

Anyone who thinks otherwise, shame on you.

Bye:D












Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s